Snail Mail for Children – A very special gift idea for very special people

Snail Mail for Children – A very special gift idea for very special people

How wonderful it is to say “Hello. I Love You. I’m Thinking of You” to your favorite little person. Every month.

I love The Petit Cadeau’s  Snail Mail for Children because it does exactly that.

Every month the child will receive a colorful, fun, engaging letter in their mailbox that features something special from Oliver + Olivia.

At $37.50 (including postage!) for six months of eagerly awaited joy (and a great excuse to talk with those little blessings later), it’s totally worth it. I can’t wait to hear about the response from my niece and nephew when they get theirs.

Alison is an artisan and “Thoughtful Gift” enabler. (love that). She sells her Snail Mail for Children on Etsy and shares great ideas and content on her website. She’s done a great job putting something creative, useful and affordable together and I highly recommend checking it out.

 

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Brooklyn’s Niche Factories Replace the Giants

Brooklyn’s Niche Factories Replace the Giants

Storytelling: Martin Greenfield Clothiers

“A Factory in Brooklyn” featuring Martin Greenfield Clothiers. By Style Ledger

… and they’re thriving!

the face of manufacturing in 2012 Brooklyn. The big industrial behemoths that until the 1960s once made Brooklyn a rival to Chicago’s image as the “stormy, husky brawling City of the Big Shoulders” are mostly gone. Domino sugar, Eberhard Faber pencils, Schaefer beer, Pfizer pharmaceuticals, companies that sold their products across much of the country and sometimes the world, have found locations where wages, taxes and real estate costs are lower, traffic is not as snarled, regulations are not as burdensome, and there is elbow room for the scale required by modern machinery and trailer trucks. Their departures have cost the city thousands of jobs nearly every year for decades.

But in a shift that has been both celebrated and parodied, Brooklyn is increasingly retaining some of its remaining industrial spaces for small-scale, small-batch manufacturing.

A surge of young entrepreneurs eager to produce $7 chocolate bars made from hand-roasted and hand-ground cocoa, or build theater and movie sets or fashion high-end furniture for a connoisseur’s market find the smaller spaces carved out of these old factories precisely what they have been looking for.

Click here to read this excellent NY Times article by . It’s a fascinating account of the replacement of huge factories by “niche” manufacturers catering not only to the rich but to the rest of us who appreciate the diversity, quality and sheer joy of the artisanal.

After reading Joseph’s article about the new artisans, take a look at  A Factory in Brooklyn (Martin Greenfield Clothiers). They’ve been masters of their craft for over a century and are in greater demand than ever.

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First Farmers Markets of the Year – Framingham and Hopkinton

First Farmers Markets of the Year – Framingham and Hopkinton

Yay. We made it through another long, dreary, wet winter and are back in the swing of summer again. Maybe a little early, but that’s ok with me.

Kicking off the season with a visit to the Farmers Markets gave me a chance to say “hello” to the folks who put a smile on my face every time I see them. Some old friends, some new, all special. The Framingham Market, opened on Thursday June 9th, was on the other side of the Common yesterday due to roadwork, but it seemed busier than usual. Some new vendors and I was especially happy to see the new “Community Showcase” booth that the market Manager, Jacky, put in place. Yesterday it was person-ed by an old friend from the Fountain Street Studios who brought her hand-made knit sweaters (kid sized, but she does whatever you want), and some beautiful jewelry. A storm came through and everyone hustled to close down before the big gusts and driving rains came … the grey sky and storm clouds were spectacular but not a marketer’s best friend, that’s for sure.

Hopkinton, MA Farmers Market is held every Friday 12 - 6pm at Weston Nurseries,

The Hopkinton Farmers Market at Weston Nurseries Friday, June 10, 2011 through Friday, October 14, 2011 Every Friday 12:00 – 6:00 p.m. The market is located in the Garden Center main parking lot. 93 East Main St. (Rte. 135), Hopkinton. Buy Local, Buy Fresh! Local growers and vendors offer THE BEST homegrown and handmade items.

The Hopkinton Farmers Market at Weston Nurseries opened on a brighter, calmer Friday June 10th. I finally got a chance to meet (and hug) Buffy Cave, manager of the Market, holistic artisan and entrepreneur, and a big part of the local scene.

Overall the market was fairly bustling. Late spring this year brought native strawberries, lots of radishes and fresh herbs, breads & other baked goods, hand-made wood, gourd, jewelry, stained glass, tie-dyed clothing, home-made jams and pickles,  a few food & coffee trucks, and On The Edge Knife Sharpening.

I’m looking forward to the coming weeks as more fruits and veggies ripen, but Hopkinton’s Market is always a great stop whether it’s for food, friends, gifts for yourself or special people, or as part of your visit to Weston Nurseries for whatever reason (and there are lots of great reasons to visit Weston Nurseries too!). You can also find (and LIKE) them on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/HopkintonFarmersMarket.

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